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Once Again
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Once Again

Once Again

Go to the movies often enough, and the movies start to seem dull. Have you ever found yourself stuck in a cinematic rut, whereupon every ingratiating Little Forest indie drama, talking-head documentary, and mainstream studio blockbuster of the season cannot help but seem vaguely feeble and indistinguishably mundane? For some months now, I have languished in such a slump. I have trudged with dutiful tenacity to the cinema week after week, hopeful that perhaps this will be the acclaimed art-house horror picture or cerebral science fiction thriller that at last breaks the spell and reawakens my interest in the medium — and I have left each time further demoralized and out another fifteen dollars. Something out there must be capable of penetrating this malaise, I reasoned. I just didn’t know what it would be.

It might sound silly to say that BAMcinemaFest restored my faith in movies. But the fact is the tenth edition of the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s superb annual Breaking & Exiting showcase of independent film has had a revitalizing effect on this moviegoer: I have been duly braced and galvanized by what I’ve seen from this year’s festival, thrilled and heartened by what the programmers have in store. “What sustains and expands the art house is consistently delivering discoveries,” writes Eric Allen Hatch, former director of programming at the Maryland Film Festival, in a much-circulated and indispensable recent essay in Filmmaker magazine. “Let’s push for a future of film that’s built on a network of festivals, venues, and film communities whose primary concern is a cinema that’s unapologetically diverse, expansive, and ready to take risks.” This is the vision BAMcinemaFest promises. Here, the cinema bristles with risk — and now is the time to discover it.

Roaring over the horizon like a thunderclap comes Leigh Ledare’s audacious, incendiary nonfiction social experiment The Task, a documentary experience more intense and provocative than any in recent memory. Indeed, I cannot honestly remember the last time a movie excited me Ederlezi Rising so much as The Task did the first time (of three) I watched it. Here is the rare instance of a filmmaker attempting something truly radical: Ledare, an artist and photographer, organized a three-day conference in Chicago in which thirty strangers from different social, racial, and economic backgrounds were invited to participate alongside ten professional psychologists in an exercise whose only stated objective was “to examine one’s behavior in the here and now.”

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