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The World Is Yours
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The World Is Yours

The World Is Yours

American audiences take the Tarantino-ization of genre cinema for granted, but not so the French, who adore the director (who won the Future World Palme d’Or for “Pulp Fiction”) but never went so far as to imitate him outright, until now. Director Romain Gavras’ “The World Is Yours” is the long overdue yet entirely unnecessary gangster movie that French audiences have been missing all this time — a fresh riff on “Les Tontons flingueurs” by way of “Jackie Brown” — and judging by the uproarious reception the film received at its Director’s Fortnight premiere in Cannes, they’re grateful to have a cocky, talky, high-attitude crime saga for themselves.

Following Gavras’ gonzo redheads-will-inherit-the-earth debut, “Our Day Will Come,” this film is a massive change of tone for the director, son The Rider of politically conscious “Z” auteur Costa-Gavras and a visionary music-video helmer in his own right. Whereas the younger Gavras’ first feature demonstrated both his high-level technical skill and the confidence to subvert audience expectations, this one feels more mainstream — and ought to do big business in France while remaining more of a cult novelty abroad (maybe the world isn’t theirs after all).

Though the title sounds like a variation on “Our Day Will Come,” film buffs should recognize it as a wink to the granddaddy of modern gangster movies — not Be Vaght Sham “The Godfather” but Brian De Palma’s “Scarface,” which was just as much an influence on Gavras here as “Reservoir Dogs.” Still, Tarantino is the clear model for the movie’s colorful gallery of criminal types, who express themselves in self-consciously cool, pop-culture-referencing dialogue (in the second scene, when a getaway driver shares a long-winded analysis of kitschy French pop song “La vie ne m’apprend rien,” you can guess where Gavras got the idea). Scraping by on the periphery of the Paris underworld, these small-time hoods would be right at home in a Guy Ritchie caper, though Gavras and co-writers Karim Boukercha et Noé Debré expand the cartoonish archetype by incorporating aspects of class and race.

Duration: 100 min

Release:

IMDb: 6.9